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Grain Bin Safety Week - Helpful Tips


If you’ve ever been around a farm, you’ve no doubt seen grain bins. These large structures are designed to store grain until they can be transferred away from the farm. However, not many people outside the agricultural industry know just how dangerous grain bins can be. Grain bin accidents are one of the leading causes of death on the farm, with 30 deaths across the USA annually. Global Track Warehouse is passionate about rubber tracks, but we also want our customers to get the job done safely. Here is a list of safety tips to remember while working around grain bins.


1) NEVER ENTER A GRAIN BIN ALONE. Safety experts recommend having at least one other person outside the bin with access to safety equipment and the training necessary to render aid, including pulling the other person out. Persons entering the bin should wear a safety harness and a lifeline secured prior to entry.

2) Before entering the bin, make sure all moving parts are stopped and power is disconnected. This can prevent someone accidentally turning on the equipment while another person is in the bin.

3) Do not “walk down” the grain or walk on the grain to get it moving. This may cause an avalanche of grain that could cause entrapment. Instead, use a tool like a shovel, broom, or long pole to break up the grain and get it moving.

4) Run the fans before entering the bin. This can help dissipate the dust and other particulates that may have built up inside the bin.

5) Wear the proper safety equipment. In addition to your safety harness and lifelines, wearing additional safety equipment such as respirators, safety glasses, and gloves can prevent injury while working in the bin.


If you are around when a grain bin accident occurs, CALL 911 IMMEDIATELY. If someone is trapped in grain, DO NOT TRY TO RESCUE THEM YOURSELF.


If you need more information on grain bin safety or other farm safety resources, contact the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the United States Department of Agriculture, or your local Farm Bureau.

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